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5 Reasons To Wear Sunglasses In The Fall

When we think of fall accessories, the first things that come to mind are warm sweaters, plush scarves, or a snug pair of boots. Here’s another essential item to add to your list: a good quality pair of UV-blocking sunglasses.

But why is it so important to protect your eyes when the sun seems to be hiding behind clouds on most days? While it may not make much sense, you’ll get a better understanding by the time you finish reading this article. So let’s dive in and explore the 5 reasons you should protect your eyes from the sun in the fall.

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Sunglasses: Summer Vs. Fall

The Sun’s Position

While we may squint more in the summer, the sunlight’s path to the eyes is more direct in the fall as the sun sits closer to the horizon. This places our eyes at greater risk of overexposure to UV rays.

Changing Temperatures

Irritating symptoms like dry, red, or watery eyes are often due to the season’s cool and harsh winds. The colder the air, the stiffer and thicker the eyes’ tear oils (meibum) become. Because thicker meibum doesn’t spread as evenly over the surface of the eyes, the tears can’t offer sufficient protection and moisture.

Minimize irritation by shielding the eyes from cool winds with wraparound sunglasses.

Shore Family Eyecare Eye Clinic and Sunglasses, Eye Protection and Fall Fashion in Manasquan, New Jersey

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Our Manasquan eye doctor has prepared the following answers to your questions about eye disease.

UV Rays

Exposing your eyes to the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays is problematic year-round, as it can result in serious eye diseases, such as cataracts and macular degeneration. That’s why it’s important to wear 100% UV-blocking sunglasses anytime you’re outdoors, no matter the season.

Make sure to sport your sunnies even on cloudy days, as up to 90% of UV rays pass through clouds. Furthermore, outdoor objects like concrete and snow reflect a significant amount of UV rays into the eyes.

Fall’s Dangerous Sun Glare

Because the sun is positioned at a lower angle in the fall, it can produce a brutal glare that poses a danger for driving. Rays of light that reflect off of smooth surfaces like the metal of nearby cars can be so bright to the point of blinding the driver.

You can combat this dangerous glare by wearing polarized sunglasses. These lenses reduce the glare’s harmful effects by filtering out horizontal light waves, such as the ones reflected by a shiny car bumper.

Local Sunglasses, Eye Protection and Fall Fashion in Manasquan, New Jersey

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Looking for Sunglasses Near You?

Here’s the bottom line: you need to protect your eyes by wearing sunglasses in the fall and year-round, no matter the season or climate. Investing in a stylish pair of durable, UV-protective sunglasses is — simply-put — a worthwhile investment in your eye health.

So if you’re looking for advice about a new pair of high-quality sunglasses for the fall, with or without prescription lenses, visit Shore Family Eyecare. If standard sunglass lenses are too dark for you at this time of year, ask us about green or brown tinted lenses; they transmit more light and contrast to the eyes than standard grey tints.

We’ll be happy to help you find that perfect pair to protect your eyes, suit your lifestyle needs and enhance your personal style. To learn more, call 732-719-3307 to contact our Manasquan eye doctor today.

Call Shore Family Eyecare on 732-719-3307 to schedule an eye exam with our Manasquan optometrist.

Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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How To Prevent “Mask Fog” on Your Glasses

If you wear glasses and a face mask, you’ve probably struggled with “mask fog.” Your lenses get all misty, requiring you to wipe your eyewear throughout the day. Below are a few strategies to help you prevent your eyeglasses from fogging up when wearing a mask.

But First, Why Do Glasses Fog Up?

Quite simply, condensation forms whenever moist warm air hits a cool surface. Your specs fog up when the mask directs your warm breath upward instead of in front of you — which is great for preventing virus transmission but bad for anyone with less-than-stellar eyesight.

Is Your Mask Well Fitted?

The mask should fit securely over your nose. Ideally, you’ll want to wear a mask with a nose bridge or one that can be shaped or molded to your face. When the mask fits properly, hopefully most of your breath will go through it, not out the top or sides.

Shore Family Eyecare Eye Clinic and Mask Fog, Optometry, Eye Health in Manasquan, New Jersey

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Our Manasquan eye doctor has prepared the following answers to your questions about eye disease.

Use Your Glasses To Seal the Top of Your Mask

This method works best with large, thick eyewear frames. By pulling your mask up higher on your nose and placing the lower part of your eyeglasses on the mask, you can get a snug fit that blocks your warm breath from escaping upward toward your eyewear.

Tape Your Mask to Your Face

You can always use tape to secure your mask across the bridge of your nose and the top of your cheeks. Use easy-to-remove tape, including adhesive, medical, or athletic. Just be sure to stay away from duct tape.

Local Mask Fog, Optometry, Eye Health in Manasquan, New Jersey

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Soap and Water Help Prevent Fogging

This trick is one that healthcare professionals regularly turn to. All you need for this hack is soapy water (dish soap works best) and a microfiber cloth. Stay away from soaps with lotions in them as they can leave a thick residue, making it even harder to see.

Simply rub both sides of your lenses with a drop of soap, then buff the lenses with a soft microfiber cloth. This effective trick helps prevent your lenses from fogging up as a transparent, thin film of soap acts as a barrier.

Anti-Fog Wipes and Sprays

Another option is to purchase wipes and sprays designed to tackle foggy lenses. Read the fine print, as certain anti-fog solutions may not work as well, or may even damage lenses with coatings that minimize glare and fingerprint smudges, for example.

To learn more about ways to keep your glasses from fogging while wearing a mask, contact Shore Family Eyecare in Manasquan today.

Call Shore Family Eyecare on 732-719-3307 to schedule an eye exam with our Manasquan optometrist.

Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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What Will Optometry Practices Look Like Post-COVID?

The Changing Face of Eye Care

COVID-19’s rapid sweep across the country has forced optical practices to make rapid clinical management decisions. Some optometrists temporarily shuttered their businesses due to the pandemic, while others began to offer emergency appointment services and telehealth.

As mandatory restrictions begin to lift in many locations, optometrists are beginning to open their doors for routine care. But this time around they will implement strict social distancing guidelines and take unprecedented precautions to limit the spread of infection.

Some of the Changes You Should Expect to See At Our Manasquan Eye Clinic

1) Signage throughout the office spelling out new steps and protocols to ensure maximum safety for staff and patients alike.

2) Social distancing will be the new norm. Packed waiting rooms will be a thing of the past. Instead, clinics will be spacing out seating to reduce capacity and scheduling in longer intervals to minimize patient interactions. Some clinics may ask patients to wait in their cars until they receive a text message from the office stating that they can come in.

3) Certain practices will require appointments for individuals to see and try on the array of frames and sunglasses at the dispensary. Bookings will be in 15-20 minute increments, accessed by one individual at a time.

4) Methods will be introduced to decrease the number of surfaces a patient touches. This will include leaving the clinic’s front door open (or replacing it with a motion-activated door), facilitating cashless payments, and encouraging patients to fill out registration forms online.

5) Patients who aren’t feeling well or who have been in contact with someone who is ill will be asked to reschedule their appointment two to three weeks in the future.

6) Measuring one’s temperature at the entrance will become commonplace — this goes for both staff and patients. Though not the most reliable screening tool, as those who are asymptomatic can still spread the virus, it will identify some people who aren’t well. Anyone registering 100.4° or above will be sent home.

7) There will be more time between appointments, to allow the staff to thoroughly clean and disinfect before and after each patient’s visit.

8) Many eye practitioners will be wearing safety goggles and face masks, particularly during any up-close contact with the patient. Patients may also be asked to wear masks.

9) Individuals with suspected ocular infections will be put in a special containment area.

10) Practices will frequently wipe down any patient area, including chairs, counters and doorknobs. Every exam room will be completely disinfected between appointments. In the dispensary, frames will be promptly disinfected after patients touch them.

11) Patients will be requested to wash or disinfect their hands upon entering the office and when entering different rooms. Shore Family Eyecare in Manasquan has strict hygiene and sterilization protocols in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and other infections.

If you’re dealing with a vision or eye health issue and need to visit Shore Family Eyecare, or if you would like some more information on how we have adapted our practice due to COVID-19, please don’t hesitate in contacting us. We’ll be happy to assist you however we can.

Shore Family Eyecare serves patients from Manasquan, all throughout New Jersey.

Call Shore Family Eyecare on 732-719-3307 to schedule an eye exam with our Manasquan optometrist.

Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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Your Eyes Are the Windows to Your Health

Your eyes aren’t just the windows to your soul — they can also reveal valuable information about your general health beyond whether you need glasses, including: diabetes, heart disease, and even cancer. It is not unusual for people to come in for an eye exam just to check their eyesight and then have certain health issues or predispositions picked up by the optometrist.

Eye Exams and Your Health

Eye examinations can help doctors detect general health conditions early enough to intervene. Advanced screenings enable eye doctors to better predict cardiovascular incidents like stroke, and possibly detect signs of mental changes such as Alzheimer’s. Read below to learn how eye exams can unveil a whole lot more than just eye health.

Brain Cancer & Stroke

Because of the similarities between the blood vessels in the eye and brain, an eye doctor can occasionally detect an issue taking place in the brain by examining the blood vessels in the eyes. If swelling or shadows in the eye is observed, it may indicate a serious condition in the brain, like a tumor, or clots that might result in a stroke.

Diabetes

Diabetes can cause damage to the blood vessels in the retina at the back of the eye, resulting in Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) and Diabetic Macular Edema (DME). If an optometrist detects leaky blood vessels in the eye, the patient would be advised to see a doctor to help control their blood sugar. Changes are gradual, and they start before visual symptoms are noticed. The earlier diabetic eye disease is managed, the better the chances are of preserving eyesight.

Hypertension

High blood pressure, characterized by having too much pressure in the blood vessels, can be detected during an eye exam, sometimes even before it’s diagnosed by your regular doctor. The damaged blood vessels lead to swelling, hemorrhages, and leaking — all of which can be observed in the eyes. According to the CDC, hypertension “the silent killer” affects nearly 1 in 3 adults, and up to a whopping 20% of those don’t even know they have it. So early detection at an eye doctor’s evaluation can be truly life-saving.

High Cholesterol

Eye exams can also detect a buildup of cholesterol. High cholesterol is among the easiest conditions to spot during a complete eye exam, as the cholesterol deposits manifest on the front of the eye, appearing as a thin, gray rim around the cornea. It can also be detected in the retina by assessing artery and vein patterns.

These deposits may indicate the current or future development of Retinal Blood Vessel Occlusion, a condition where blockages restrict blood flow to the back of the eye, causing temporary or permanent vision loss.

Shore Family Eyecare Eye Clinic and Eyes and Health in Manasquan, New Jersey

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future?

Our Manasquan eye doctor has prepared the following answers to your questions about eye disease.

Heart Conditions

In some cases, heart conditions associated with a buildup of plaque in the carotid artery in the heart can also lead to deposits that clog the ocular arteries in the eye. If an optometrist detects such changes to the vascular structure at the back of the eye, he or she will typically recommend going to a specialist.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Sudden vision loss may be attributed to Multiple Sclerosis (MS). While the optometrist can recognize signs indicating the presence of MS, such as the color and appearance of the optic nerve, such cases will be referred for further testing to confirm the diagnosis.

Thyroid

Thyroid disease can make itself apparent through the eyes in several ways. The thyroid gland controls the hormones that regulate tear production so some thyroid disorders can cause dry eye disease. Additionally, overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) can make the extraocular muscles enlarge and stiffen, causing bulging eyes — an indicator of Graves’ disease.

Inflammation

Systemic conditions that are associated with inflammation in the body can have an inflammatory effect on the eyes. Uveitis, for example, causes eye inflammation, redness, and blurred vision, and tends to occur in people with lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, and other autoimmune diseases.

Cancer

Breast cancer, leukemia, and other metastatic cancers are occasionally discovered during an eye evaluation. In addition to brain cancer mentioned above, melanoma and basal cell carcinoma (skin cancer) can be detected, and eye doctors can also diagnose lymphoma and other eye tumors. Eye exams save lives.

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What the Future Holds

Alzheimer’s

Recent studies show that a non-invasive and precise imaging device called Octa (optical coherence tomography angiography) can signal the presence of eye changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Because the retina is in many ways an extension of the brain, the altered blood vessels at the back of the eye offer a glimpse into the changes taking place within the brain.

Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s Disease can often be misdiagnosed as its early symptoms are characteristic of other conditions. Research has shown that subtle eye tremors, an early Parkinson’s marker, could be detectable using advanced eye exam technology. One day soon, practitioners may send patients to an eye doctor to test for this and other diseases.

Your Eye Doctor’s Appointment Could Change Your Life

So the next time you visit Dr. Harvey Richman at Shore Family Eyecare in Manasquan, remember that a comprehensive eye exam can do more than determine your eyeglasses or contacts prescription. Dr. Harvey Richman can evaluate your eyes for existing or potential health issues, and communicate them to your primary care physician for the best possible care. By knowing that you’re at risk for a certain disease, you can take precautions early on and manage the condition as needed. After all, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Call Shore Family Eyecare on 732-719-3307 to schedule an eye exam with our Manasquan optometrist.

Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

FOLLOW US


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Bifocal and Multifocal Contact Lenses 

Here’s Why Hydrogen Peroxide is an Excellent Contact Lens Solution

Once you and your doctor have decided on the type of contact lenses you’ll need, it’s time to choose the most suitable contact lens solution for your eyes and contacts.

There exist 2 different types of solution for contact lenses: Multipurpose and Hydrogen Peroxide-based. While both remove debris and build-up, and disinfect lenses, only hydrogen peroxide is capable of penetrating the microbial biofilms for a deeper clean. As an added benefit, hydrogen peroxide does not contain preservatives — which can be particularly beneficial for those with allergies or eye sensitivities.

Multipurpose Contact Lens Solution

Multipurpose solutions are straightforward and easy to use; only one solution is needed to rinse, clean, disinfect and store your contacts (as seen in the image). Their convenience and low cost make them a popular choice.”

Shore Family Eyecare Eye Clinic and Contact Lens in Manasquan, New Jersey

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Our Manasquan eye doctor has prepared the following answers to your questions about eye disease.

Hydrogen Peroxide Contact Lens Solution

Hydrogen peroxide solutions, such as Clear Care® by Alcon or Refine One Step™ by CooperVision, contain no preservatives or allergens. This solution thoroughly breaks up the proteins and removes deposits on the lenses during the disinfection process, which can be beneficial for people who tend to accumulate large amounts of build-up on their lenses. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide is more effective at battling acanthamoeba keratitis (an eye infection that may lead to blindness) than all other types of contact lens solutions.

Since hydrogen peroxide is a chemical that causes stinging and burning when it touches the eye, after the contacts have been disinfected the solution must be neutralized to be healthy for your eyes. Included with every solution bottle is an upright contact lens case containing a platinum-coated disk that chemically reacts with hydrogen peroxide to decompose it into a safe, non-irritating, sterile saline solution. This chemical reaction produces bubbles inside the case as it undergoes the transformative process over a period of several hours. Since the neutralizing disk loses its effectiveness over time, it is critical to regularly replace it.

If your eyes do make contact with hydrogen peroxide, make sure to immediately flush it out with sterile saline. If saline is not available, wash your eyes with water or artificial tear drops and make sure to see Dr. Harvey Richman as soon as possible. Though painful, it doesn’t cause permanent eye or vision damage.

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How does it work?

To clean your lenses, place them in the designated case that is freshly filled with the hydrogen peroxide solution and soak them for 6-8 hours. This can be a one-step or two-step process, depending on the product. The one-step products contain a built-in neutralizer in the contact lens case, while the two-step products require you to add a neutralizing tablet to the solution after cleaning.

Make sure not to reuse or top off hydrogen peroxide solution after it has been neutralized, as it will have lost its disinfecting power.

Be sure to dry your case thoroughly between uses and to replace your case every 2-3 months to prevent infection.

It is important to note that hydrogen peroxide solutions will change into unpreserved saline. Therefore, if contact lenses are stored for extensive periods of time (e.g. more than a couple days), it is safer to consider multiple-purpose solutions for long term.

Hydrogen peroxide-based solutions are known for their exceptional disinfecting ability. At Shore Family Eyecare, in Manasquan, our patients are extremely satisfied with the cleanliness and comfort they experience when using hydrogen peroxide-based solutions for their contact lenses. Speak with Dr. Harvey Richman to find out whether this solution is right for you.

Call Shore Family Eyecare on 732-719-3307 to schedule an eye exam with our Manasquan optometrist. Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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Paraoptometric Community Service Award

Marietta Richman has worked as a paraoptometric at Shore Family Eyecare for more than six years, starting by simply answering the phones. She trained under three optometrists and a CPOA, learning the basic ocular anatomy, then diagnostic testing and interpretation, advancing to working in the vision therapy room and with the low vision population. Marietta excels with the special needs population that comes to Shore Family Eyecare. Her drive to help in the field of optometry directed her to enter college in search of a Public Health degree to lead her to optometry school in the future.

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The five most common low vision devices

There are a growing number of people with vision impairments. Many people find that a low vision magnifier can assist with tasks such as reading the fine print, sewing or viewing classroom presentations. Increased demand for low vision devices means more choices are becoming available. More than 3.3 million Americans older than 40 already have blindness or
low vision — and that number is expected to increase to 5.5 million by 2020, according to the National Eye Institute.

Eyeglasses usually can correct refractive errors such as nearsightedness and farsightedness. But, ordinary lenses don’t work for permanent blind spots in your visual field, caused by common eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. Be aware that one size does not fit all when it comes to low vision

Be aware that one size does not fit all when it comes to low vision devices. One particular kind of magnifier helpful to someone with peripheral vision loss, for example, might not work at all for someone with central vision loss.

If you need any low vision option, visiting a low vision specialist for expert guidance is important to find the right device for your specific needs, especially if you already have substantial vision loss. Before buying any low vision magnifier, take the time to explore the array of choices available in lenses, video camera

Before buying any low vision magnifier, take the time to explore the array of choices available in lenses, video camera magnifiers, and lighting. Think carefully about your goals, your budget and what features various devices offer so that you can better communicate your needs to your low vision expert.

The five most common low vision options for our patients are available in these general categories:
1. Lamps/Lighting
2. Low vision reading glasses
3. Handheld or stand magnifiers
4. Video camera magnifiers
5. Telescopes

While most private insurance and Medicare does not cover the cost of low vision devices at this time, to be best prepared, this is a general cost range for different devices:
Lamps or Lighting Sources, $90 to $300
Low vision reading glasses, $70 to $500
Handheld or stand magnifiers, $50 to $250
Video magnifiers, $500 to $3,000
Telescopes, $90 to $2,000

Never rush to buy an expensive device for yourself or a family member without doing some checking first. Finding the right low vision device is a very individual choice, depending on specific vision loss and needs.

Macular Degeneration and Low Vision

senior man in thought2Macular degeneration (or age-related macular degeneration, abbreviated AMD) is one of the leading causes of vision loss in America. The disease affects the retina, the layer of tissue at the back of the eye that re. This layer has photo-receptors that are stimulated by light and send signals to your brain, thereby generating vision. Specifically, AMD affects the central part of the retina called the macula and this is the portion of your eye that is used in primary visual activities that require the finest acuities, such as reading and driving. Macular degeneration occurs in either a dry (atrophic)or wet (exudative) form. In either case, the disease only affects the central vision and rarely causes total vision loss.

The majority of patients have the dry or atrophic type of macular degeneration. In this form of the disease, the slow deterioration of there tina is often coincidental with the formation of small yellow deposits,known as drusen, in the macular region. This accumulation of drusen leads to a thinning of the macular tissues, causing distortions in vision that initially appear as wavy. The eventual amount of central vision loss is directly related to the location or the amount of retinal thinning caused by the drusen.

The exudative, or wet form of the disease, is far less common (about 20%of AMD cases), but it is more aggressive and threatening to one’s vision. In the wet type of macular degeneration, abnormal blood vessels grow under the retina and macula through a process called neo-vascularization. These new blood vessels may bleed and leak fluid, thereby causing the macula to bulge or lift up, distorting or destroying central vision. In these circumstances, vision loss may be rapid and severe.

Although much research is being done on finding treatments for macular degeneration, no current treatment exists for the more common dry form,and the treatment for the wet form sometimes does not meet patient’s expectations. As macular degeneration advances the severity of the vision loss increases often requiring specialized low vision aids for macular degeneration. These devices are designed with the purpose to combine research, technology, and daily application for providing visual assistance to individuals living with macular degeneration. For many AMD patients, the use of low vision aids or vision rehabilitation is of great help and allows them to enhance their quality of life and remain independent.

Understanding the effects that AMD has on vision helps determine what features are preferred when finding the optimal low vision aids for macular degeneration.

Macular degeneration directly affects the light sensitive tissue in the eye, to which additional lighting will aid in tasks like reading and writing. Simple adjustments can be made in the home by increasing the presence of natural light, or by adding lamps that mimic natural lighting. Lighting selections are an ideal feature for vision aids for macular degeneration allowing adjustable increased lighting and contrast viewing modes,supporting the damaged retina.

Sharp, fine detail vision is also compromised as a result of macular degeneration. Visual aids that allow, black and white viewing modes, color,and other contrast/ sharp image focused features provide additional control and low vision support.

Some electronic low vision aids for macular degeneration allow screen-viewing modes that support the use of peripheral vision. The loss of central vision or missing spots in vision can be supported through the eccentric viewing options. For example, if you are using a handheld magnifier and viewing a photograph, you can the magnifier to the sight line of your peripheral vision. This is also helpful with menus, transportation schedules,and more. Tailoring to the vision strengths, our low vision aids for macular degeneration will increase supporting your remaining vision areas.

GET YOUR SOLAR ECLIPSE GLASSES AT SHORE FAMILY EYECARE.

On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of the United States will have a solar eclipse. The moon will cover at least part of the sun for 2 to 3 hours. Halfway through, anyone within a narrow path from Oregon to South Carolina will experience a brief total eclipse. The moon will completely block the sun’s bright face for up to 2 minutes 40 seconds. Day will turn into night, and (weather permitting) one of nature’s most awesome sights will become visible: the sun’s shimmering outer atmosphere, or corona. The American Optometric Association, in partnership with the American Astronomical Society, is providing detailed information so that you can safely view the eclipse.
Here are four ways to safely view a solar eclipse:
The only safe way to view a partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses” or viewers that meet international standard ISO 12312-2 for safe viewing. Sunglasses, smoked glass, unfiltered telescopes or magnifiers, and polarizing filters are unsafe. If you can’t find eclipse viewers, build a pinhole projector to watch the eclipse.
Technique of the pros. Before looking at the sun, cover your eyes with the eclipse viewers while standing still. Glance at the sun, turn away and then remove your filter. Do not remove the filter while looking at the sun.
Totality awesome. Only within the path of totality-and once the moon completely blocks the sun-can eclipse viewers safely be removed to view totality. Once the sun begins reappearing, however, viewers must be replaced.
If you should experience discomfort or vision problems following the eclipse, visit Dr. Richman or Dr. Kinzley for a comprehensive eye examination.
We have a very limited supply of approved solar eclipse viewers that are available to our patients only. If interested, please like our page and stop in for your free pair.

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Low Vision: Helping People Live Their Lives

There’s a place between 20/20 and blindness, and it’s called low vision. Most people whom have it are older and having other vision impairing problems. Low vision is not a disease in its own right, but it usually goes along with other age­ and health related conditions.

Diabetes with retinopathy, macular degeneration,glaucoma and cataracts are the usual suspects. About three million of them are in the United States. One definition of low vision is where eyesight is functionally impaired even with correction.

Functional impairment is extremely subjective so some people with vision of 20/50 are limited in what they can do while others at 20/200 are still successful at their daily activities. For example, “If an accountant can’t read spreadsheets with ordinary prescription glasses or contacts, they belong in the category of those with low vision,” he says. On the contrary, someone who is spending their days fishing or watching television may not be impacted.

For many, low vision also means legal blindness, defined as corrected visual sharpness of20/200 or worse in the better eye.There is help for people trying to live a normal life with low vision. Visual Aids are available to help with nearly all tasks. It sounds simple, but there’s high ­tech behind it.

The best method for people to improve their sight with low vision is just making things appear bigger.That’s where magnifiers come in and in several varieties:Eyeglass or spectacle­ mounted. Magnifiers and telescopes can be placed directly on glasses. This is good because it leaves hands free to do other things.

Magnifiers are for close-up tasks and telescopes for seeing things farther away (like a ball game, for example). Hand­held and stand: For on ­the­ go activities, hand­held magnifiers help people take better vision with them. Helpful for reading price tags, for instance. The stand type is better for prolonged reading as it doesn’t require steady hands. Electro­optical systems. These complex­ sounding tools are special closed-circuit TV devices that make video images larger.

Over the past few years, these have dominated the low vision doctors options as they offer greater flexibility, larger magnification and the prices have been reducing.Besides magnification options, there are plenty pretty easy time finding large­ print books, magazines and other reading materials. Mobile phones, iPads, Kindles and even basic web sites are also moving toward giving the option to increase image size on screen.

Additionally, illumination is a major help with most patients that are struggling with their vision. Using the appropriate lighting with full spectrum bulbs often is enough to take a person from difficult to functional.Clear vision and a sense of independence go hand-in- hand, so low vision aids are key for people living with the condition. Don’t let low vision limit the world around you; visit your eye doctor to learn which visual aids will work best for you.

 

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